Monday, 23 January 2017

How I recovered completely from high blood pressure without chemical drug

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On the 29th of March, 2014, I was just lying down in my lobby reading a novel meant for my niece ‘purple Hibiscus’ for relaxation since I rarely had time during week days for such leisure. All of a sudden, letters were becoming blurred.
I could not see the letters very well and I also felt a very sharp pain in my chest, accompanied with a severe headache and shortness of breath.

The headache was more like a migraine. My niece saw the level of my discomfort and enquired to know what was wrong with me and I told her to quickly consult our family doctor. She narrated to the doctor how I was feeling. When the doctor arrived, the chest pain had subsided a bit, but I was still feeling feverish and headache.

THE DIAGNOSIS

When the doctor arrived, he examined my BP using sphygmomanometer and it read 160/100. He told me that was abnormal and that I was at the stage two of high blood pressure. I began to wonder what the possible cause could be because I was four months pregnant and that got me really worried. I was scared of losing my life and not being able to protect the unborn baby. The doctor prescribed some medications almost immediately and warned me to desist from certain foods and habit. He asked me not to eat food such as canned foods, fatty foods, whole milk, doughnut, red meat, table salt, less caffeine, alcohol and a whole lot. It was then I sensed how miserable my life was turning into, because those were the foods I could easily lay my hands on at the lunch hours at work.


I continued with my medication and tried as much as possible to do away with junks and fats.On the 16th of June 2014, I lost my dad and I couldn’t bear the loss because I love him so much, my condition worsened and by then my BP read 170/100. The doctor warned that there is high tendency that I will suffer from postpartrum psychosis if I should put to bed in this condition. I was placed under intensive medical care and was frequently monitored.


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